May 22, 2024 Last Updated 6:09 AM, May 21, 2024

Political Rights

Gambling with truth

Aceh’s Commission for Truth and Reconciliation has an important, though delicate, mission ahead

Indonesia’s diaspora citizens

After decades of neglect, Indonesia’s diaspora demands more rights

When ‘home’ is not home

Locals react coolly to ex-transmigrants who return to Java after fleeing violence elsewhere

A drink for humanity

Honouring Indonesian activist Putu Oka Sukanta for humanity

Masa lalu yang tersembunyi

Esai foto-foto Pulau Buru

No ‘magic bullet’

Dealing with human rights abuses has been business as usual under the Jokowi administration

I am Suciwati

A monologue

Review: The Crocodile Hole

Saskia Wieringa’s latest novel brings to life a dark period in Indonesia’s past

A hidden past

The state should acknowledge the contribution of political prisoners on Buru

Politics from below

Street vendors have organised successfully at the local level, but effective national organisation has proved more elusive

Review: Coming to terms with 1965

Can the descendants of both sides of 1965 come together to help the nation achieve reconciliation?

Election year

Edward Aspinall Indonesia’s legislative elections offer a window into the deep forces shaping the country, and a glimpse of its political future Indonesia is part way through its election year, having held its legislative elections on 9 April, and with the country now gearing up for the first round of the presidential polls in July. With more than 235,000 candidates running for seats in national, provincial and district legislatures around the country, the April poll was a massive logistical affair. It was also the culmination of years of effort, expense and stress for a huge number of people. Yet in some ways, the actual results of the election were an anti-climax.

Remembering Munir

A museum dedicated to the memory of the famous activist strives to promote human rights awareness among the younger generation

Seeking identity, seeking Indonesia

Pulang'sauthor reflects on writing the stories of those unseen and unheard

Big prison, little prison

Stories from Papua’s political prisoners show life at the edge of freedom

On the struggle for press freedom

Former political prisoner Eko Maryadi speaks to Nikki Edwards about his incarceration during the New Order

Review: At the scene of the crime

Essays, reflections and poetry on East Timor, 1999-2010

Living without a state

People in rural Papua are more interested in basic services than grand political struggles

Survival through slavery

Suspected communists who survived the killings of 1965-66 in South Sulawesi spent the next 20 years working for the military in an isolated jungle camp

Latest Articles

Labouring in vain?

May 03, 2024 - HASNA A. FADHILAH

The Labour Party (Partai Buruh) was revived in the wake of opposition to the Omnibus Law on Job Creation, but failure in the 2024 election shows they failed to connect...

Book review: Uncovering Suharto's Cold War

Apr 19, 2024 - VIRDIKA RIZKY UTAMA

Film review: Inheriting collective memories through 'Eksil'

Apr 12, 2024 - WAHYUDI AKMALIAH

A documentary embraced by TikTokers is changing how young people understand Indonesia’s past

Indonesians call for climate action through music

Apr 11, 2024 - JULIA WINTERFLOOD

Self-education and lived experience of the impacts of climate change, are driving a grassroots environmental movement

Book review: Clive of Indonesia

Apr 05, 2024 - DUNCAN GRAHAM

Subscribe to Inside Indonesia

Receive Inside Indonesia's latest articles and quarterly editions in your inbox.

Bacaan Bumi: Pemikiran Ekologis – sebuah suplemen Inside Indonesia

Lontar Modern Indonesia

Lontar-Logo-Ok

 

A selection of stories from the Indonesian classics and modern writers, periodically published free for Inside Indonesia readers, courtesy of Lontar.