May 23, 2019 Last Updated 3:09 PM, May 22, 2019

Society

Bangun! Banjir!

Seorang antropolog Belanda tinggal di permukiman kumuh di bantaran kali Jakarta untuk memahami bagaimana warga di sana hidup berdampingan dengan banjir
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Wake up! Flood!

A Dutch anthropologist lived in a Jakarta riverside slum to learn how residents there cope with constant flooding
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Aging remarkably

A lifelong activist and retired midwife is teaching her peers to stay engaged… and not burden their children
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Passing it on

On a recent study trip, journalism student Lisa Favazzo met two people giving back to their communities in extraordinary ways
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#StayAlive

Kemampuan media sosial untuk mencabut stigma seputar bunuh diri masih belum digunakan sepenuhnya
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Short Documentary: Voices From Greater Jakarta

Voices From Greater Jakarta

Australia/ Indonesia | 2018 | Colour | All Ages | 10:00 | Documentary | Producers: Iwu D. Utomo, Ariane J. Utomo, Peter McDonald

As the election year unfolds, Indonesians are being reminded frequently of the tremendous ‘power’ of the young generation. But who are the so-called millennial voters, and do politicians have a good grasp of what the most pertinent issues are that they face in their everyday lives?

According to media coverage, some of these candidates would have us believe that the average millennial voter in Indonesia is an upper middle class city-dwelling tertiary graduate (most likely living in Jakarta); looking for work with a relatively high starting salary in the creative or digital sector; changing jobs every year because they want to travel; and spending their days leisurely sipping an artisan latte in an instagrammable café, daydreaming about running the Tokyo marathon as they swipe their phone.

Nothing could be further from reality. While this millennial lifestyle may apply to a very select group, it does not represent everyday realities for the vast majority. According to a new longitudinal study, it is not even true for many millennials in metropolitan Jakarta where the average level of education among young adults is the highest in Indonesia.

In 2009, a team of Indonesian and Australian researchers began a large study of young adults in Jakarta, Bekasi and Tangerang, otherwise known as the Greater Jakarta region. The study sought to understand their experiences of transitioning into adulthood. According to the 2010 Indonesian Population Census, there were about 61 million people aged 20 to 34 in Indonesia that year. With marked achievements in literacy and education relative to the older generation, this large cohort of young adults was poised to bring about the country’s so-called demographic bonus.

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#StayAlive

Social media’s ability to help cut through stigma and misinformation on suicide is being underutilised
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Latest Articles

Review: Bridges of Friendship

May 17, 2019 - ANITA DEWI

An excellent reminder of the strength and importance of relationships between people of different cultures

Aging remarkably

May 16, 2019 - DUNCAN GRAHAM

Tati (Tatik) Soepijarniwati, 86 years, seems too small, too slight and too old to agitate / Author

A lifelong activist and retired midwife is teaching her peers to stay engaged… and not burden their children

Review: Flowers from Universe

May 06, 2019 - LAURIE MARGOT ROSS

Consort seated at spinning wheel, c.1910.  Reproduced in CM Pleyte, De Inlandsche nijverheid in West-Java als social-ethnologisch verschijnsel. Vol. 2, 1911. Batavia: Javasche Boekhandel en Drukkerij.

Textiles from Java

Passing it on

May 02, 2019 - LISA FAVAZZO

Image/ Lisa Favazzo

On a recent study trip, journalism student Lisa Favazzo met two people giving back to their communities in extraordinary ways

A temple to populist nationalism

Apr 29, 2019 - IAN CHALMERS

Muslim devotees attend Sukarno's graveside / Ian Chalmers

Sukarno’s gravesite is very popular but there is much irony in the way his memory is celebrated

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