Sep 28, 2022 Last Updated 2:22 AM, Sep 25, 2022

Law

Brother killing brother

The East Timorese resistance movement also committed crimes.

Religion on trial

Woman who claims to speak to angel Gabriel tests ‘constitutional rights’.

No reformasi?

Reforms give no improvement in the courts for ordinary people

Justice for Papuans?

New Human Rights Court fails victims’ calls for justice.

Community justice

Why do people in Banyuwangi kill ‘sorcerers’?

Justice for women?

New anti-domestic violence law brings hope for women.

Zealous reformers

Will a positive start for the Constitutional Court lead to practical changes for ordinary citizens?

Tortured legacy

Legal reform must overcome a history of authoritarian development

Muddling through

Indonesia’s brave experiment in reinventing its legal system

Fighting words

In his last interview, Pramoedya kept up his attack on elitism and corruption.

Regulating worship

Some Christian and Muslim leaders view the new Ministerial Decree on Houses of Worship as restrictive.

One Step Forward

Indonesia has made only some legislative progress toward religious freedom, but the greatest freedom is the openness of debate.

Contested land claims

Which Dongi people should be compensated for land?

Unions act globally

Workers unite to win severance pay for retrenched Securicor Indonesia employees.

Water, land, and Suharto

Review: Both books illustrate the way the Suharto family exploited Indonesia

Christmas in a prison camp

The following excerpts are taken from a diary of letters kept by an Australian woman who lived in Java, Kalimantan and Bali for nine years. In this letter, written in January 1978, the author describes her visit to a detention camp for women political prisoners Just after Christmas 1977. The prisoners have since been released. The letter begins with a description of the long drive from Semarang west to Pelantungan where the camp was located up in the mountains. The visit was arranged by a Dutch pastor, 'Co'. Fenton-Huie was accompanied by the pastor's wife, Phia, and a Dutch nursing sister, Truus. After abandoning their car which could not travel the last stretch of the rough rocky road, the women had to walk the final kilometres to the camp, which also held 40 delinquent boys. The visitors shared a simple Indonesian meal in the house of one of the guards before entering 'a large barracks-type hall' to witness the camp's Christmas concert.

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A selection of stories from the Indonesian classics and modern writers, periodically published free for Inside Indonesia readers, courtesy of Lontar