Feb 24, 2021 Last Updated 4:08 AM, Feb 22, 2021

IRIP Board

Chair

Jemma Purdey joined the IRIP board in 2007 after a stint as guest editor a few years earlier. Her interest in Indonesia came via her passion for human rights causes beginning in the early 1990s and an interest in knowing more about our near neighbours. Jemma has spent extended periods of time travelling, studying and researching in Indonesia. She wrote a PhD on anti-Chinese violence in Indonesia during the last years of the New Order and after reformasi and she is author of From Vienna to Yogyakarta: The life of Herb Feith, UNSW Press, Sydney 2011. Until his sudden death in 2001, Herb Feith was one of Inside Indonesia’s earliest supporters. Jemma is a co-host of the Talking Indonesia podcast, Director of ReelOzInd! Australia Indonesia Short Film Festival and an adjunct Fellow at the Australia-Indonesia Centre and Deakin University.

Treasurer

Anton Lucas is Treasurer of the IRIP Board. He arrived in Yogyakarta from the University of Hawaii 's East West Center in late 1969 on an Indonesian language semester study programme and it changed his life forever. He wrote a PhD on the independence struggle of 1945 on Java's north coast, and has since taught in Indonesia , in Makassar (1984-85), and in Yogya (1990-92). After Inside Indonesia started in the mid-1980s, he signed up his wife Kadar's extended Yogya family and a Catholic nunnery in Central Java as subscribers. Kadar's family were interrogated by intelligence officers, and the nuns were accused of spreading banned Marxist teachings. Indonesia has changed a lot since then, but the magazine maintains its commitment to social justice, and what is happening at the grass roots level in the largest Muslim country in the world which is Australia 's closest neighbour. Anton taught Asian Studies and Indonesian at Flinders University for many years, and has a particular research interest in agrarian and environmental issues.

Secretary

Tito Ambyo grew up in Bandung, where he wrote plays, poems and punk songs (he was a member of at least three punk bands) and failed a year of high school. He came home from school one day to find out that Soeharto was no longer president; that confused him enough that he started asking questions that led to his first article as a journalist, and since then he has worked in East Timor, Indonesia and Australia and his articles have been published by magazines and newspapers such as Visual Arts Magazine and The Guardian. 
Tito moved to Australia at the beginning of the millennium and has worked as a reporter, producer and executive producer in his seven-year stint with the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. He is now an Associate Lecturer in Journalism at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, teaching online and broadcast journalism.

Other Members

Gerry van Klinken and his partner Helene became avid readers of Inside Indonesia when they were living in Salatiga, Central Java in the late 1980s. After both submitting pieces and being thrilled when they were published, Gerry found himself editing the magazine in 1996. After moving to a guest editor system in 2002 he continued to be actively involved in the magazine, first as coordinating editor, and later as a member of the editing committee. He is now a researcher in the Netherlands. Gerry is continually struck by the infectious energy that Indonesia inspires in those who return from their travels. He sees that energy as a sustaining force for the magazine. Helene and Gerry's own memories of Indonesia include high adventure, back-packing around the archipelago and being shipwrecked at night on a coral reef in a traditional sailing boat! They both want the magazine to be a 'bridge between people, to challenge stereotypes, to highlight movements and individuals who we think symbolise a better tomorrow'.

Yatun Sastramidjaja was born and raised in the Netherlands but spent three childhood years in Bandung, after which she has returned to Indonesia almost every year for family visits and later for research. For her PhD at the University of Amsterdam she did research on the Indonesian student movement. She has also published on youth cultures and heritage movements in Indonesia, and taught Indonesian History at the Erasmus University Rotterdam. Currently she is a lecturer in Youth Studies at the University of Amsterdam. She has been a huge fan of Inside Indonesia since first publishing an article for Inside Indonesia in 1999, and was delighted to join the team in 2010.

Tim Fitzgerald first joined Inside Indonesia when he was living in Jakarta, working as a copy editor at The Jakarta Post and various local organisations. He has a Bachelor of Arts (Indonesian and Cultural Studies) from the University of Melbourne and a Grad. Dip. in Education from RMIT. Before moving to Indonesia he taught Indonesian and Humanities at high schools and primary schools in Victoria. He started learning Indonesian because he had to; continued to Year 12 because he enjoyed the performance challenge; and then majored in it and moved there because he was, and is, excited about the greater understanding and engagement speaking the language provides for as a visitor and a guest there. He was previously Media and Communications manager at the Australia-Indonesia Centre.

Latest Articles

Review: An improbable nation

Feb 16, 2021 - MADE SOMA

Review: Indonesia Calling 2020

Feb 08, 2021 - RON WITTON

Ipehnur Beresyit/ The Chronicle of Twenty Twenty: Pagar, 2020/ hand drawn batik, 110 x 150 cm

Essay: Liberating learning in Indonesian higher education

Jan 10, 2021 - DELITA SARTIKA

Workers of the future will need soft skills to keep up / Flickr Creative Commons - Lau Rey

A new higher education policy is expected to bring about reform that will strengthen its role in connecting knowledge and science to society’s needs

Far-sighted approach to migrant rights

Dec 21, 2020 - WHISNU SETIAWAN

Photo by Antara

The Indonesian government is much more interested in its own citizens abroad than Filipino migrant workers under its nose

Subscribe to Inside Indonesia

Receive Inside Indonesia's latest articles and quarterly editions in your inbox.

 


Lontar Modern Indonesia

Lontar-Logo-Ok

 

A selection of stories from the Indonesian classics and modern writers, periodically published free for Inside Indonesia readers, courtesy of Lontar