Nov 24, 2020 Last Updated 3:35 AM, Nov 18, 2020

Economy

Sex and tea in Semarang

Sex and tea in Semarang

The peculiar relationship between sex and jasmine tea in downtown Semarang keeps both police and prostitutes in a game of cat and mouse.

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Shifting faultlines

Shifting faultlines

In the aftermath of religious conflict, ethnic difference is becoming more prominent in Ambon

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An unlikely unionist

An unlikely unionist

Inspired by television and Muchtar Pakpahan, a traditional fisherman decides it’s time to act.

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Children at work

Officially, 2.4 million Indonesian children work in factories or on the streets, instead of being at school. Unofficially, the number could be 10 million. SHARON BESSELL talks with some working children, and asks what is being done.

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Waiting for Ngaben

Kuta Beach ceased some time ago to be what the brochures say it is. For Robert Goodfellow, the piles of plastic rubbish are signs of a deeper malaise.

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Fishing in Australian Waters

In the past decade, 140 Indonesian fishermen drowned in Australian waters, a further 400 were imprisoned. JILL ELLIOTT reports that policies dealing with the issue are costly, ineffective and have tragic consequences. She suggests better alternatives.

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Regulate or abolish?

Should child labour be abolished or regulated? WENDY MILLER spoke with activist ARIST MERDEKA SIRAIT during the Child Labour Conference at Melbourne's Monash University.

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Information revolution

Satellite TV and the Internet are opening Indonesia to the globe. MARK CRAWFORD asks: Will this mean less mind control by the state?

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New forms of rural conflict

Idyllic rural Java is rapidly becoming urban. As a result, peasants are now less in conflict with landlords than with the state. This radically changes the way we think about the best way to organise for change, according to JUNI THAMRIN andVEDI HADIZ.

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Colonial legacy

It may be true that Java rules Indonesia. But Javanese labourers in Sumatra, writes BUDI AGUSTONO, have been at the bottom of the heap for generations.

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Privatising social justice

As riots erupt across the country, Suharto is forcing rich companies to contribute to a private anti-poverty foundation. But, for DAVID BOURCHIER and IAN CHALMERS, the move smacks of personal greed.

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Big projects, little people

After 20 years, LEA JELLINEK returns to Jakarta's kampungs only to find many demolished for condominiums. The mood of their constantly evicted residents oscillates between resignation and resistance.

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Gone fishing

AHMAD SOFIAN explores the lives of young people on hundreds of isolated fishing platforms in the Malacca Straits

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Why so serious?

Oct 15, 2020 - PRATIWI UTAMI

Twitter/mumaxxmuma

Netizens’ responses to the banning of a popular slang word raise questions about the moral character of public communication

Review Essay: Banishment and belonging

Oct 02, 2020 - RON WITTON

Japanese and Malay Pearl Divers / State Library of Western Australia

Essay: Seeking solace in the midst of COVID-19

Sep 25, 2020 - SEBASTIAN PARTOGI

Since the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak the book club has hosted weekly virtual meetings/ Baca Rasa Dengar

Book clubs and creative communities have headed online where they provide Jakartans with vital connections and solace during the pandemic

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A selection of stories from the Indonesian classics and modern writers, periodically published free for Inside Indonesia readers, courtesy of Lontar