Sep 25, 2020 Last Updated 8:00 AM, Sep 25, 2020

Economy

Artists seek assistance

Javanese traditional musicians are among the many artists and performers struggling to survive, or qualify for government payments under COVID restrictions
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Bogus redemption

Mudik forms a bogus redemption for many precarious workers amid a lack of decent jobs in both rural and urban areas

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Passing it on

On a recent study trip, journalism student Lisa Favazzo met two people giving back to their communities in extraordinary ways
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Short Documentary: Voices From Greater Jakarta

Voices From Greater Jakarta

Australia/ Indonesia | 2018 | Colour | All Ages | 10:00 | Documentary | Producers: Iwu D. Utomo, Ariane J. Utomo, Peter McDonald

As the election year unfolds, Indonesians are being reminded frequently of the tremendous ‘power’ of the young generation. But who are the so-called millennial voters, and do politicians have a good grasp of what the most pertinent issues are that they face in their everyday lives?

According to media coverage, some of these candidates would have us believe that the average millennial voter in Indonesia is an upper middle class city-dwelling tertiary graduate (most likely living in Jakarta); looking for work with a relatively high starting salary in the creative or digital sector; changing jobs every year because they want to travel; and spending their days leisurely sipping an artisan latte in an instagrammable café, daydreaming about running the Tokyo marathon as they swipe their phone.

Nothing could be further from reality. While this millennial lifestyle may apply to a very select group, it does not represent everyday realities for the vast majority. According to a new longitudinal study, it is not even true for many millennials in metropolitan Jakarta where the average level of education among young adults is the highest in Indonesia.

In 2009, a team of Indonesian and Australian researchers began a large study of young adults in Jakarta, Bekasi and Tangerang, otherwise known as the Greater Jakarta region. The study sought to understand their experiences of transitioning into adulthood. According to the 2010 Indonesian Population Census, there were about 61 million people aged 20 to 34 in Indonesia that year. With marked achievements in literacy and education relative to the older generation, this large cohort of young adults was poised to bring about the country’s so-called demographic bonus.

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Latest Articles

Essay: Seeking solace in the midst of COVID-19

Sep 25, 2020 - SEBASTIAN PARTOGI

Since the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak the book club has hosted weekly virtual meetings/ Baca Rasa Dengar

Book clubs and creative communities have headed online where they provide Jakartans with vital connections and solace during the pandemic

A 150-year old obstacle to land rights 

Sep 18, 2020 - AHMAD DHIAULHAQ & WARD BERENSCHOT

Protestors calling for land reform, Jakarta, September 2019 / Dhemas Reviyanto / ANTARA FOTO

The Dutch colonialists adopted the concept of domein verklaring (domain declaration) to claim control over a large part of Indonesia’s land. This act lives on in modern-day Indonesia, causing conflict...

Thoughts for Lance Castles

Sep 14, 2020 - ANTHONY REID

Lance Castles, painted by Yasin Tiar in 1999

Obituary: Remembering Lance Castles (1937–2020)

Sep 13, 2020 - MARGARET KARTOMI et al

Lance in a seminar in Jakarta / TEMPO/NIHIL PAKURIL

Book Review: Man of Contradictions

Sep 07, 2020 - MARCUS MIETZNER

 / @jokowi Instagram

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A selection of stories from the Indonesian classics and modern writers, periodically published free for Inside Indonesia readers, courtesy of Lontar