May 16, 2022 Last Updated 8:50 AM, May 6, 2022

Fall of Suharto

Teaching and remembering

The legacy of the Suharto era lingers in school history books

How far to meaningful democracy? - 1

What you see is what you get.

Stable but unpopular

Indonesians have a love-hate relationship with their political parties.

The peace dividend

With no internal wars to fight, Yudhoyono can afford to reform the military.

Basket case to showcase

How Indonesia’s democratic transition transformed Aceh.

How far to meaningful democracy? - 2

Democracy is feasible, but only if Indonesia’s democrats take on the elite.

Ten years of democratisation

Our new edition shows how far Indonesia has come, and how much remains to be done.

Remembering Ong

About cooking, studying Java, and other serious pleasures

A day with Indonesia's radical student organisation

Authorities blame the recent Jakarta riots on the coalition PRD. It has hundreds of members, but military leaders liken it to the PKI of the 1960s, which had millions. Who are these 1990s activists? VANNESSA HEARMAN visited with one of the coalition partners earlier this year, and filed this inside story.

How might the Suharto era conclude?

The events of 27 July have led many to speculate about a more democratic order after the end of Suharto's powerful rule. MICHAEL VAN LANGENBERG warns such speculation may be misplaced.

Change in Indonesia, chance for East Timor

Transition to a post-Suharto era in Jakarta could be window of opportunity for East Timor. What might that window offer, asks COKI NAIPOSPOS?

The student movement

Students are few in number but loom large on the political stage. The PRD affair demonstrated this once more. In this reflective essay, ARIEL HERYANTO asks why this should be so.

Privatising social justice

As riots erupt across the country, Suharto is forcing rich companies to contribute to a private anti-poverty foundation. But, for DAVID BOURCHIER and IAN CHALMERS, the move smacks of personal greed.

'All a pretence' - Interview with parliamentarian Aberson

Parliament, Aberson Marle Sihaloho explains to SHARON TICKLE over lunch, can never do a good job under Suharto.

Smoking gun

The fires were no natural disaster, says JOKO WALUYO. The smoking gun is in the hands of plantation companies.

Political gangsters

The riot that engulfed Jakarta on 27 July 1996 started after army-backed gangsters invaded Megawati's PDI headquarters. JESSE RANDALL traces the strange relationship between government and criminality.

Godly men in green

Abri officers are becoming more Islamic, but many do not want their Islam to become a political tool for the administration, according to MARCUS MIETZNER.

Kings or kingmakers

Senior ABRI intentions may be obscure now, says BOB LOWRY, but no one should assume they will remain that way.

Watch these five!

DAMIEN KINGSBURY puts his money on five military winners in the presidential stakes. Indonesians call them the five Pendawa.

Taking on the timber tycoons

It's lonely in the Forestry Minister's office, says GERRY VAN KLINKEN.

Latest Articles

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A major research project on Dutch extreme violence in the Indonesian war of Independence, 1945–1949

Obit: Hugh O’Neill AO, 1933-2022

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Contesting the religious soundscape

Mar 23, 2022 - ANDY FULLER

A controversial regulation governing the call to prayer sparks a campaign aimed at taking down the Religious Affairs Minister

Essay: Hey Holland, you’re welcome!

Mar 15, 2022 - TITI KUSUMANDARI

Indonesia’s independence from the Dutch came at a price – Indonesians are still waiting for them to acknowledge it

Book review: Activists in transition

Feb 01, 2022 - JONATHAN PETER TEHUSIJARANA

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A selection of stories from the Indonesian classics and modern writers, periodically published free for Inside Indonesia readers, courtesy of Lontar