Jan 27, 2023 Last Updated 12:03 AM, Jan 26, 2023

Social Movements

Design and architecture in Indonesia

  Alexandra Crosby The role of design in social change has received increasing public attention in the last decade. User-centred, iterative, participatory flexible approaches to the design of objects, spaces, communications, services and experiences are valued by policy makers and firms all over the world to address issues of social justice, sustainability and urban development. Simultaneously the territory within which design operates has been changing. Design is sometimes used synonymously with consumerism, urban tastes, and globalisation, such as ‘designer handbags’, but what design is and what it does is much more complex, and many of these new definitions of design are emerging in Indonesia.

Dancing against violence

Not even Mount Kelud erupting could stop Yogyakarta's activists from standing up against violence to women as part of One Billion Rising

Running in style

A new bug for running points toward a new politics of lifestyle

Indonesia’s new anarchists

Insurrectionary anarchists, with international connections, nihilist values and a penchant for arson, are moving to fill the vacuum on the left

Art and the city

Indonesian artists are using new media to rethink urban space

New social media as a tool for activism

Indonesia is Facebooking, Twittering and blogging, but what effect is this having on campaigns for social justice? Indonesia is online. The number of Indonesians using the internet increased from two million in 2000 to over 55 million in 2012, the fourth largest number of internet users in Asia (after China, India and Japan).

Rock music and social activism on the internet

Bali rockers Navicula find a platform for social change in online social media

Online networking and minority rights

LGBT communities use social media to organise despite threats of violence

Clicktivism and the real world

Social media tools are only effective if they can engage people off-line

Facebooking for reform?

Social media campaigns highlight the need for criminal law reform in Indonesia

‘You’re crazy. Don’t make up things!’

Celebrity gossip shows denigrate homosexuality, but at least they talk about it

Religious Bandung

Bandung’s government opts for a religious program that matches the city’s character

Organising for migrant worker rights

Non-governmental organisations continue to fill the gap in the absence of viable alternatives

Seeking representation

Activists in Palu remain confined to the political margins

Struggling to be young

Brotherhood among the poor urban youth of Jakarta

Hubs and wires

Internet use in Indonesian NGOs is strengthening civil society

Demonstrating diversity

Photo-essay: Yogya’s community protests against the Pornography Bill

Hot debates

A law on pornography still divides the community

Music for the fight, movements for the soul

Fight-choreography in West Java is a source of cultural pride

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