Dec 05, 2022 Last Updated 6:29 AM, Nov 29, 2022

National Politics

Love at first sight Slorc meets Abri

ANDREAS HARSONO visits Burma and is intrigued by the respect its military show for the Indonesian model.

A local hero

To Jakarta, he is an enigma. To the Madurese, he holds out hope for a better society. GERRY VAN KLINKEN goes to the grass-roots.

Not your local member

When this teacher tries to explain the electoral system, he ends up in knots. SUGENG PERMANA listens in.

Godly men in green

Abri officers are becoming more Islamic, but many do not want their Islam to become a political tool for the administration, according to MARCUS MIETZNER.

Kings or kingmakers

Senior ABRI intentions may be obscure now, says BOB LOWRY, but no one should assume they will remain that way.

Watch these five!

DAMIEN KINGSBURY puts his money on five military winners in the presidential stakes. Indonesians call them the five Pendawa.

Taking on the timber tycoons

It's lonely in the Forestry Minister's office, says GERRY VAN KLINKEN.

In the line of fire

Facing a sceptical public, Abri has to talk harder to justify its political role. JUN HONNA listens in.

Indonesian spying on East Timorese exiles

PETER CRONAU and MATTHEW BROWN find that Cold War methods live on in Indonesian consulates around Australia.

No crisis please

The currency crisis is making Thailand more democratic, but not Indonesia, says PRIYAMBUDI.

More educated, more ruthless

DAVID BOURCHIER looks at the new generation of military leaders, after a big shakeup between July and October 1997.

The end of the Asian miracle

The IMF recipe is no cure for Asia's collapsed economies, says WALDEN BELLO. Instead, a people's strategy is emerging that looks to self-reliance and democratic control over capital.

Markets, morals and leadership after the boom

Authoritarian Southeast Asian governments have been dealt a blow by market forces, says MICHAEL VATIKIOTIS, but democracy will not flourish until people begin to organise locally.

We want a new government!

There are plenty of capable Indonesians who can take over from Suharto, says the activist group PIJAR.

Thinking through a new tomorrow

What should democracy activists do in these last days of the New Order? DANIEL LEV offers some pointers.

How to love a country in a time of crisis

Indonesia has been brought to its knees by a small club of crony capitalists, says GOENAWAN MOHAMAD. The IMF deal offers hope because it will weaken their grip on the economy of 200 million other Indonesians.

From go-go to yo-yo

GERRY VAN KLINKEN traces the spectacular financial events that paralysed the country's business and political elites.

Friend or foe?

In this snapshot of politics at the end of January, ARIEF BUDIMAN worries that the embryonic alliance between Amien Rais and Megawati remains vulnerable to government attack.

Capital offence

Indonesia's crisis was caused by global 'market forces', transforming nation-states into commodities. MARK BEESON explains.

Future Indonesia 2010

What will Indonesia look like in 2010?

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A selection of stories from the Indonesian classics and modern writers, periodically published free for Inside Indonesia readers, courtesy of Lontar