Jun 30, 2022 Last Updated 4:52 AM, Jun 27, 2022

Military Oppression

In memory of martyrs

A Chinese community constructs and preserves the memory of their loved ones, the victims of racial and political violence in Banyuwangi

Through a building darkly

The story of the Teochiu Huikuan building in Medan provides insights into Chinese Indonesians’ history of dispossession

The peace dividend

With no internal wars to fight, Yudhoyono can afford to reform the military.

Aceh's year of living dangerously

Australian volunteer LEON JONES was living in Aceh in the lead-up to the violence that eventualy left up to 2000 dead.

Murder in the cathedral

IRIP NEWS SERVICE speaks with a member of Dili's Catholic Commission for Education and uncovers an assassination attempt against Nobel prize winner Bishop Belo

Left over from death

Timorese women raped by Indonesian militias need justice. So do all the other women who survived New Order abuse

War of words

Journalists covering the conflict in Aceh were embedded in a fierce propaganda war

Why not independence?

Challenging the myths about Aceh’s national liberation movement

Logging, soldiers and sex

Military business brings many problems to Papua

Brother killing brother

The East Timorese resistance movement also committed crimes.

Facing the past

Overwhelming data makes the East Timor report rock solid

Justice for Papuans?

New Human Rights Court fails victims’ calls for justice.

Jungle to church

Missionaries and the military co-operate in converting the Asmat to Christianity.

Despised delight

The Suharto Government's political prisoners have only very rarely been allowed to speak. Here, for the first time, we have an autobiographical story written by a woman, the wife of an ex-tapol, the mother of his child.

Christmas in a prison camp

The following excerpts are taken from a diary of letters kept by an Australian woman who lived in Java, Kalimantan and Bali for nine years. In this letter, written in January 1978, the author describes her visit to a detention camp for women political prisoners Just after Christmas 1977. The prisoners have since been released. The letter begins with a description of the long drive from Semarang west to Pelantungan where the camp was located up in the mountains. The visit was arranged by a Dutch pastor, 'Co'. Fenton-Huie was accompanied by the pastor's wife, Phia, and a Dutch nursing sister, Truus. After abandoning their car which could not travel the last stretch of the rough rocky road, the women had to walk the final kilometres to the camp, which also held 40 delinquent boys. The visitors shared a simple Indonesian meal in the house of one of the guards before entering 'a large barracks-type hall' to witness the camp's Christmas concert.

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A selection of stories from the Indonesian classics and modern writers, periodically published free for Inside Indonesia readers, courtesy of Lontar